69
      Friday
      83 / 64
      Saturday
      86 / 66
      Sunday
      88 / 65

      Buena Vista students attend prom, teachers to be paid

      After fears the Buena Vista School District would not reopen after money troubles today marks a positive step for the district.

      Buena Vista Superintendent Dr. Deborah Hunter-Harvill says teachers will be excited to hear they should be paid Friday after not receiving their paychecks last week.

      But Thursday night, it was all about the students who attended prom at the Golden Glow in Saginaw Township.

      "They've been through a lot. The district has been through a lot and it's a joy to see them get to this day," said Dr. Tanisha Brooks, senior class advisor.

      After the Buena Vista School District was forced to close for two weeks due to money troubles senior class advisors fought back through layoffs and no school.

      "I wanted to see the kids through to make sure they had two things. Their prom and their graduation and even though I'm on layoff I'm going to work just as hard as if i was getting paid," said Dr. Brooks.

      Students will get to celebrate both prom and graduation.

      Many excited that they could complete their high school careers the right way and celebrate prom in style.

      "I had to get my watch resized to fit me because I gotta be bling bling for the big day," laughs Lourenzo Caldwell, a Buena Vista senior.

      Caldwell and his friends anticipating the "Hollywood-Knights" themed event.

      "Everyone's going to be looking their best. I'm gonna look my best personally and we're just going to be feeling good knowing we conquered something that we really wanted," said Caldwell.

      But the future of the Buena Vista School District remains in the balances leaving administrators and students, past and present, unsure.

      "I would think I'd always have a school to come back to and say I'm alumni, I grew up here," said Caldwell.

      Meantime, the state's financial review of the district is underway.

      It could take up to 60 days but Dr. Harvill says she expects it to take less time.

      Some of the actions the state could take include appointing an emergency financial manager.

      The superintendent says she hopes the district will resume classes this Fall.