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      Deadly heroin concoction is blamed for four Flint overdoses

      Doctor James Weber at Hurley Medical Center says fentanyl is dangerously potent, and cheap. It is typically used for terminally ill patients. However, its mixture with heroin provides users with an ultimate high that can kill or destroy a family.

      "My son is alive now because he is in prison, if he was out I have no doubt that I would be planning a funeral," said Lisa Moss.

      News of four heroin related overdoses in Flint is resurfacing the pain Moss has felt since her son was arrested for heroin possession nearly a year ago.

      "My grandchildren will never by my grandchildren again because of heroin," said Moss.

      Flint Police Chief James Tolbert says heroin mixed with fentanyl is on the streets. And now rather than sending people like moss' son to jail it is killing them.

      "What we do know is in the past four days we have experienced four deaths," said Tolbert.

      The Police Department is unable to completely confirm the presence of fentanyl for now; however, Doctor James Weber says it happened in 2010 and he believes it's coming through the emergency room doors again.

      "Fentanyl is an opiate like heroin its semi-synthetic and the reason it??s so dangerous is it's at least fifty times more potent than heroin is," said Dr. Weber.

      Chief Tolbert says the four overdose deaths are all separate incidents across the city.

      In Moss' past, her son's heroin was from multiple sources, and could be found anywhere.

      "I found a hypodermic needle and heroin and a tourniquet under my granddaughter??s pillow," said Moss.

      Moss' son is serving 2-6 years in Genesee County jail. It's a sentence she says is saving his life from heroin, and a possible deadlier combination with fentanyl.

      "I would have taken a bullet had it of protected my son, my daughter in law and my grandchildren," said Moss.

      Flint Area Narcotics Group Lieutenant Pat Richard says their lab reports do not give instant results. They are unable at this time to confirm the heroin their group has been taking off the streets is mixed with fentanyl.