39 / 22
      42 / 26
      43 / 34

      Newtown officials share message with Michigan law enforcement, schools

      Law enforcement from across the state received valuable information to keep your kids safe Wednesday.

      Six months have passed since a gunman opened fire in a Connecticut elementary school.

      Now, school leaders and Newtown law enforcement are sharing their story in Mid-Michigan.

      "To go back to that day I usually have to speak from written remarks because it helps me read it as opposed to visualize it in my head," said Dr. Janet Robinson, Ph.D., Newtown Superintendent.

      Newtown school leaders and law enforcment are using the town's tragedy for the good of other communities and school children.

      "It was horrific and I will do anything I can that would help this never happen again," said Dr. Robinson.

      "The most positive thing that we can bring forth is helping prepare people should any other major incident occur," said Lt. Richard Robinson of the Newtown Department of Police.

      Newtown officials spoke before a room full of Michigan law enforcement and school officials Wednesday at the Comfort Inn Conference Center in Mt. Pleasant.

      The three-day conference featured the Newtown Superintendent and police Lt. in addition to National School Safety and Security official, Ken Trump.

      "Anything that we can share that might change guidelines and help prepare that's what we're trying to do," said Lt. Robinson.

      "When an incident abroad happens you look at your own community and think how can we do things better," said Chris Fredenburg, Crime Prevention Specialist of the Saginaw Township Police Department.

      Departments learning from Newtown that communication is key to making better and safer schools.

      "If the law enforcement doesn't understand what the school needs and the school doesn't understand what the police are doing you're failing," said Tom Daugharty, chairman of the Schools, Educators, Police, Liason Association and School Resource Officer for the Frankenmuth School District.

      Failure is not an option, say leaders, when it comes to protecting kids and communities.

      "We are about the same thing and that is protecting people," said Dr. Robinson.

      Wednesday, six federal agencies released a guide recommending best practices for emergency situations in schools.

      To view the guide, click here.