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      Plan in works to reopen Flint city golf courses

      Mott Park Golf Course was closed two years ago. / Chad Britton

      Three groups have put in bids to run Flint's four golf courses. Flint City Council is expected to review the proposals at Monday night's city council meeting.

      Only two of the four courses remain open now but if city council approves the proposals all of the courses could be up and running by next spring.

      Flint Mayor Dayne Walling says operating the courses in the past cost the city roughly $500,000 to $800,000 a year and there was just no way to continue with that.

      "We can't keep subsidizing the golf fund out of the general fund. That needs to be focused on public safety," said Mayor Walling.

      Mayor Walling says the city put out the offer looking for partners and several groups put in bids.

      "This change and restructuring will remove the long term cost and provide and immediate savings for Flint and will get these courses re-opened through these partnerships," said Mayor Walling

      The City Union would run Swartz Creek and Kearsley Lake. The Mott Park Golf Association, a group of residents and community members, would take over the course at Mott Park and another would control Pierce.

      The groups would handle all administration and maintenance costs and the city would actually take in some revenue.

      "Mott Park Golf course was a once an asset to the neighborhood but now the way it sits it's an eyesore, " said City Councilman Sheldon Neeley.

      Neeley added that as long as the course remained closed it would stand as a liability for the neighbor.

      "If we can turn it back into a usable condition, it will once again become a usable asset," said Councilman Neeley.

      Tom Saxton with the Mott Park Golf Course Association says he would like to partner up with the other two groups and figure out a way that to run the courses to benefit everyone.

      "We need to do what we can to keep these courses open. Residents need this type of recreation in their neighborhoods," said Saxton.