MENU
component-ddb-728x90-v1-01-desktop

The Flint Water Crisis is the topic of a new college course

The Flint Water Crisis is the topic of the newest college course at the University of Michigan-Flint, but this class isn't just for college students. (Photo Credit: Drew Moore)

The Flint Water Crisis is the topic of the newest college course at the University of Michigan-Flint, but this class isn't just for college students.

Professor Suzanne Selig is stepping into uncharted territory. She says she has never done anything like this in her career.

"I am not sure there has ever been an issue of the magnitude of the Flint Water Crisis," said Suzanne Selig, Director, Department of Public Health and Health Sciences at UM-Flint. "I feel that it's the responsibility of the university."

This won't be your traditional class. Selig says the goal is to get experts, community members and students to have discussions about the drinking water crisis.

"To provide a neutral environment within which the dialogue can occur," said Selig.

For UM-Flint students this class with be a one-credit course. For the public this class is free.

On the list of experts for the panel is everyone from Dr. Marc Edwards, the Virginia Tech researcher who brought the lead problem into the spotlight, to Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, the Hurley pediatrician who proved the lead levels in children in Flint had soared.

While this will help, Selig says she knows she still can't give the people of Flint what they truly want.

"I think what the community would really like to hear, is let's go back in time and make this problem go away and make it never have happened. I think that would be the only thing that would be truly satisfying. But obviously that's not realistic," said Selig.

Selig hopes this course will give the public tools to help deal with the lead exposure, but she also hopes to dig into why it started and is offering invitations to literally everyone involved.

"We'd love to have Governor Snyder come but I don't know that he would accept our invitation to do so," said Selig.

Already there has been strong interest from the community and students. The class starts January 21. For more information click here.

close video ad
Unmutetoggle ad audio on off

Trending