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Kids and corporations work to stop growing problem during Bullying Prevention Month

A group of Seattle middle school girls known as the DC Bully Busters took their anti-bullying campaign to the nation’s capital this past spring. (KOMO News)

SEATTLE -- Several local efforts are underway to help combat the growing problem of bullying during Bullying Prevention Month in October.

A group of Seattle middle school girls known as the DC Bully Busters took their anti-bullying campaign to the nation’s capital this past spring. They met with 30 lawmakers to raise awareness and to tackle what they consider to be a concerning problem among politicians.

Twelve-year-old Emma Beane said bullying in politics has been a real problem this year.

“I see a lot of name calling and interruption during debates and disrespects,” Beane said.

Beane said what she sees on TV is hurtful.

“You see on TV, these people who are leading our country and they are disrespecting tons of other people, other races," she said.

Beane's mother, Kristin Bunce, also feels similarly.

“When you see the president or other members of a high level using names that are so offensive, what are we teaching our children?” Bunce said.

Beane wants other students to join her in writing four lawmakers about what bullying means to them and why it's wrong.

“We have a goal of 10,000 letters,” said the seventh-grader. She said they've already collected about 2,000 letters from students between 3rd grade and 7th grade.

Beane is asking lawmakers to sign a pledge that states:

“I will represent the people of the United States of America without engaging in bullying or being a bystander to bullying tactics.”

On Friday, Google announced it's teaming up with Seattle Public Schools and "iCanHelpline" to battle bullying.

“iCanHelpline" launched in California several years ago. Google will fund a year-long pilot program in 40 of Seattle's public middle and high schools.

When there's bullying online, the “iCanHelpline" gives teachers and school staff the resources and a number to call for real time advice on how to deal with the problem.

“We know that 92 percent of teens are online every day. It's been reported that a third of those teens have had online harassment or cyber-bullying so we want to make sure Seattle schools has resources available to them to help these students if they are affected,” said Darcy Nothnagle, the Head of External Affairs for the Northwest region for Google.

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