Young woman on DACA worries about future, looks for other option to stay in America

Thursday, February 8, is the deadline for Congress to act. A new budget could include a solution for people who are living here legally through what's called DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. (Photo Credit: Mike Horne)

FLINT, Mich. - There are nearly 800,000 immigrants on eggshells right now. They have been dubbed Dreamers. But some worry their dreams won't have a happy ending.

Thursday, February 8, is the deadline for Congress to act. A new budget could include a solution for people who are living here legally through what's called DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

For one woman in Flint, living here legally through DACA, she worries about her future. She asked us to conceal her identity, but says she wants her story heard.

"I was a baby when I was in Jamaica," said the woman.

That is where she was born before an adoption took her across the Atlantic to northern England, and then a new marriage for her mother took them to Ghana. Then on April 22, 2000, when she was just 8-years-old, her grandmother sent for her and she came onto US soil with a visitors visa. A visa she overstayed by 13 years.

But thanks to DACA, she attained legal status again in 2013 allowing her to work and drive. Right now, she's balancing three jobs.

"Have you ever left America since coming?" asked reporter Stephanie Parkinson.

She said, "no I have never left. If I left I wouldn't be here. I wouldn't be talking to you." She continued to say, "I always think about my family, and going back to visit but America is my home."

Her mother later came to America, in August of 2000.

Most people think about America bringing dreams to life but ,at that point, it brought nightmares.

"A lot of memories and stuff I have blocked out, like the first 12 years of my life because I went through sexual abuse and what not here in the US."

She says her mother's new American boyfriend was her abuser. Eventually they got out of that situation.

Her mom got remarried again, and her mom was able to get a green card. But she didn't file for her daughter.

"It just never worked out unfortunately," she said.

Keeping this young woman in the shadows.

"Resentment, I did. But time heals all wounds," she said.

Now, in 2018, this young woman worries about what Congress and President Donald Trump will, or will not do for those under DACA.

Time is running out. In about a month, those 800,000 young people living here legally through DACA, will one by one, start to lose that legal status.

"There's fear, there is fear because I don't know anywhere else but here, this is home," said the woman.

For this young woman though, there could be another solution.

Monday night, in part two of Stephanie's report, she will explain how this woman was able to recently file a petition for a green card, and why immigration lawyers say she has a very strong chance to be approved as a permanent resident. Tune in to FOX66 News at 10 and NBC25 News at 11 Monday night.

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